WE WERE SOLDIERS
On November 14, 1965 in the Ia Drang Valley of Vietnam, in a small clearing called Landing Zone X-Ray, 400 young fathers, husbands, brothers, and sons—all troopers from the U.S. 7th “Air” Cavalry—were surrounded by 2000 enemy soldiers. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history. Here is a tribute to the nobility of those men under fire, their common acts of uncommon valor, and their loyalty to and love for one another.


(2002)


This page was created on February 28, 2002
This page was last updated on May 29, 2005

Directed by Randall Wallace
Screenplay by Randall Wallace
Book by Writing credits Hal Moore ( We Were Soldiers Once, and Young)

Mel Gibson .... Hal Moore
Madeleine Stowe .... Julie Moore
Sam Elliott .... Sgt-Maj. Basil Plumley
Greg Kinnear .... Maj. Bruce 'Snakeshit' Crandall
Chris Klein .... Lt. Jack Geoghegan
Josh Daugherty .... Ouelette
Barry Pepper .... Joe Galloway
Keri Russell .... Barbara Geoghegan
Edwin Morrow .... Prvt. Willie
Godboldt Mike White .... SFC Haffner
Mark McCracken .... Ed 'Too Tall' Freeman
Jsu Garcia .... Capt. Nadal
Tim Abell .... Army Intel Officer
Vincent Angell .... Doc Carrara
Robert Bagnell .... Charlie Hastings
Dan Beene .... Cab Driver
Luke Benward .... David Moore
Marc Blucas .... Lt. Herrick
Danny Boyer .... Sergeant
Sean Bunch .... Trooper #4
Brian Carpenter .... Robert McNamara
Doug C. Cook .... Capt. Ray Lefebvre
Alan Dale .... General William C. Westmoreland

Produced by
Bruce Davey .... producer
Jim Lemley .... executive producer
Danielle Lemmon .... associate producer
Stephen McEveety .... producer
Arne Schmidt .... co-producer
Randall Wallace .... producer
Steve Zapotoczny .... associate producer

Original music by Nick Glennie-Smith
Cinematography by Dean Semler
Film Editing by William Hoy

MPAA: Rated R for sustained sequences of graphic war violence, and for language.
For rating reasons, go to FILMRATINGS.COM, and MPAA.ORG.
Parents, please refer to PARENTALGUIDE.ORG

Trailer:
QuickTime, Hi-Res
QuickTime, Med-Res
QuickTime, Lo-Res

International Teaser:
Windows Media Player, Hi-Res
Windows Media Player, Med-Res
Windows Media Player, Lo-Res
Real Player, Hi-Res
Real Player, Lo-Res

Clips:
QuickTime, Various

Windows Media Clips
(300K Bandwidth) -- Drill Team Media
(100K Bandwidth) -- Drill Team Media (56K Bandwidth) -- Drill Team Media

CD InfoWe Were Soldiers
Various Artists - Soundtrack - 2002

The "music from and inspired by" the Mel Gibson Vietnam film is a full slate of new recordings by a wide range of mainstream stars, along with bagpipe and glee-club pieces that convey the movie's sobriety. Quiet, detailed vignettes by Mary Chapin Carpenter (Patty Griffin's "My Dear Old Friend") and India Arie ("Good Man") express the human losses inherent in the conflict, while the pop-country duo Montgomery Gentry offer "Didn't I," the plaint of the returning vet. Much of the rest is inspirational pop of various stripes. Johnny Cash and Dave Matthews team for the ethereal "For You," while Five for Fighting's "The Beautiful" recalls Matthews's most radio-ready tracks. Atmospheric moments from Christian-poppers and up-and-coming Nashville stars complete the package, which is sure to appeal both to fans of the film and those who'll apply the patriotic sentiments to present-day realities.
--Bob Roget -Amazon.com

1. For You - Johnny Cash & Dave Matthews 2. Some Mother's Son - Carolyn Dawn Johnson 3. Fall Out - Train 4. Soldier - Steven Curtis Chapman 5. Good Man - India.Arie 6. The Beautiful - Five For Fighting 7. My Dear Old Friend - Mary Chapin Carpenter 8. I Believe - Tammy Cochran 9. The Widowing Field - Jars Of Clay 10. Not So Distant Day - Jamie O'Neal & Michael McDonald 11. Didn't I - Montgomery Gentry 12. The Glory of Life - Rascal Flatts 13. Sgt. McKenzie - Joseph Kilna McKenzie 14. The Mansions of the Lord - United States Military Academy Glee Club and Metro Voices

BOOK

Book infoWe Were Soldiers Once...and Young : LA Drang
- The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam
by Harold G. Moore, Joseph L. Galloway

In the first significant engagement between American troops and the Viet Cong, 450 U.S. soldiers found themselves surrounded and outnumbered by their enemy. This book tells the story of how they battled between October 23 and November 26, 1965. Its prose is gritty, not artful, delivering a powerful punch of here-and-now descriptions that could only have been written by people actually on the scene. In fact, they were: Harold Moore commanded the men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, who did most of the fighting, and Joseph Galloway was the only reporter present throughout the battle's 34 harrowing days. We Were Soldiers Once... combines their memories with more than 100 in-depth interviews with survivors on both sides. The Battle of Ia Drang also highlights a technological advance that would play an enormous role in the rest of the war: this was perhaps the first place where helicopter-based, air-mobile operations demonstrated their combat potential. At bottom, however, this is a tale of heroes and heroism, some acts writ large, others probably forgotten but for this telling. It was a bestseller when first published, and remains one of the better books available on combat during the Vietnam War.
--John J. Miller -Amazon.com

Paperback [ABRIDGED]
Abridged Book on Audio Cassette

MEL GIBSON and RANDALL WALLACE
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SYNOPSIS
400 Fathers, Brothers, Husbands & Sons.

On November 14, 1965 in the Ia Drang Valley of Vietnam, in a small clearing called Landing Zone X-Ray, Lt. Col. Hal Moore (Mel Gibson) and 400 young fathers, husbands, brothers, and sons?all troopers from the U.S. 7th ?Air? Cavalry were surrounded by 2000 enemy soldiers. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history. We Were Soldiers is a tribute to the nobility of those men under fire, their common acts of uncommon valor, and their loyalty to and love for one another. Starring alongside Gibson are Madeline Stowe (Last of the Mohicans, The General?s Daughter), Sam Elliott (The Contender, Gettysburg, Tombstone), Academy Award nominee Greg Kinnear (As Good As It Gets), Chris Klein (Election), Golden Globe winner Keri Russell (Felicity), and Barry Pepper (Saving Private Ryan, The Green Mile).

Written for the Screen and Directed by Randall Wallace Produced by Bruce Davey, Steve McEveety, and Randall Wallace Based on the New York Times Bestseller We Were Soldiers Once? And Young by Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore (Ret.) and Joseph L. Galloway

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BEST MOVIE OF THE DECADE
Subject: We_Were_Soldiers
Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002
From:Bryan Walker

 We Were Soldiers is the best movie of the last ten years and the most important movie for America in the last twenty years. This movie is technically accurate, following the book in most details, and communicates with power, passion and empathy. By far this movie is the best of the Viet-Nam war movies because it simply tells the story of the American fighting man, the wives and kids who were left behind and it humanizes the enemy.

 It is a movie that is appropriate for the times in that it is patriotic without resorting to "chest thumping" jingoism. Like Blackhawk Down and Saving Private Ryan this movie focuses on the courage, brotherhood and compassion of soldiers in the heat of mortal combat, yet the inclusion of the wives' story throughout the movie also shows the courage of the women who support their men.

 My only complaint about the movie is that it should have somehow included General Moore's conclusion about the importance of the battle for changing American policies, which he concludes led to the loss of the war. This was alluded to a couple of times in the movie but needed spelling out at the end. The inclusion of the French tragedy at the beginning did ground the events historically which was excellent.

Every American ought to see this movie!

Bryan Walker

GREAT MOVIE
Subject: We_Were_Soldiers
Date: Sat, 9 Mar 2002
From: Harry Diehl

 I saw the movie today and I cried through half of it. It was weird for me because I was in the 7th Cavalry in 1958, only seven years before the events in the movie take place. It certainly is an anti-war movie, because after seeing it, no one in their right mind would want to see human beings go through what these heroic soldiers went through. It also was refreshing to see a man who practices his faith praying with his children at bedtime, and frequently thanking God for His mercy in battle. Yes, it's pretty gory, but so is war. I think every young male 16 years old and up should see it, so he can appreciate the price that was paid for the freedom we sometimes take for granted.
Harry Diehl,
Johnson City, TN

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We Were Soldiers ? 2002 - Paramount Pictures - All rights reserved