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Features:
Greg Wright Norman Stone: Beyond Shadowlands
Greg Wright An Interview with Michael Flaherty
PATRICK"CoachZ" ZALAMEA
Why do we love stories like Narnia?

Reviews by
DAVID BRUCE (video)

GREG WRIGHT
TOM PRICE
JACOB SAHMS
KATHY BEDSOE
MICHAEL SMITH
YO
GEORGE ROSOK
JENN WRIGHT
KEVIN MILLER

PETER "PapaBear" CRUIKSHANK


Jenn and Greg WrightNARNIAHOLLYWOOD JESUS NARNIA BLOGS
Hosted by Jenn and Greg Wright.

NARNIA FEATURES
NARNIA NEWS

 
Click to go to David's Blog
HJ FLASH VIDEO REVIEW
by
DAVID BRUCE

Click to go to Mark's Blog

TWO GIANT BEAST RULED

Article by MARK EZRA STOKES

Two giant beasts ruled the holiday seasonbox office:
King Kong and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe


Though many see a rivalry between the mighty lion and the colossal gorilla, I see this as an opportunity to watch two well-made and enjoyable films.
Article by MARK EZRA STOKES

Click to go to Ken's BlogReview by
KEN PRIEBE

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The Chronicles of NarniaSAY WHAT YOU WILL., I LOVED IT!

The real kicker for me was the little epilogue at the end, and the dialogue between the Professor and Lucy. The final image of the light peeking out and Aslan roaring made me literally weep for joy, and left me with the sense of awe I needed.

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Patrick "CoachZ" ZalameaFeature by
PATRICK "CoachZ" ZALAMEA

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The Chronicles of NarniaWhy do we love stories like Narnia, Lord of the Rings, even Star Wars, and the Matrix? Because they are a copy of the original story, in other words they are an echo of the bigger story. I believe that God is unfolding a terribly awesome, dramatic, comedic, action packed story. And it is etched as it were in our hearts…which includes our thoughts, emotions, and senses. Without even knowing it movies, fairytales, songs, poems, mythic stories all strike at that echo that is reverberating in our hearts.
The Chronicles of Narnia - Part I
The Chronicles of Narnia - Part II
The Chronicles of Narnia - Part III
On the MOVEME blog- A Journal by CoachZ

 

Click to go to Jacob Sahms's blogReview by
JACOB SAHMS

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The Chronicles of NarniaI found The Chronicles of Narnia by Walden Media to be much more enjoyable as an adult than I found the BBC series—it’s amazing what millions can do! The acting is better, the sets are better, the special effects are better. But the truth is, it’s still the story that makes it work, and we owe our thanks to C.S. Lewis. Many reviewers will give better compare and contrast (with the book) or play-by-plays than I can. But I was so strongly moved by the way in which the gospel of Jesus Christ shone through the movie, that I put my remarks out here for consideration.

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Click to go to Kevin's BlogReview by
KEVIN MILLER

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If you were a beaver and four humans showed up on your doorstep wearing fur coats, would you let them in? I certainly would have second thoughts. Funny how that idea never occurred to me before, even though I’ve read about the Pevensie children’s first encounter with the talking beavers of Narnia countless times. It just serves to illustrate the difference between experiencing a work of literature in your imagination and viewing it on the big screen. Suddenly things look a whole lot different—some better, some worse. It also raises the question as to whether such stories are best left to the imagination. I’m still trying to decide in terms of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Perhaps the choice would have been easier if I had enjoyed the film more than I did…

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Click to go to PapaBear's blogReview by
PETER "PapaBear" CRUIKSHANK

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The Chronicles of Narnia was an unbelievably beautiful and moving film. I have to admit that I was a bit skeptical before attending the advance screening of The Chronicles of Narnia. I was both excited, having anticipated this release for a long time, but simultaneously concerned that it couldn’t possibly live up to my expectations. Well, I can tell you truthfully that I was wrong. It not only lived up to my expectations – it exceeded them. But as a measure of my own reaction I sometimes check with my teenage daughter to see how she feels about a movie (acts as a counter to make sure I am not viewing it from my older, much older perspective). So, if you don’t want to take my word for it, my daughter said it was the best movie she has ever seen and plans to see it at the theater several times.

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Click to go to Jenn's  BlogReview by
JENN WRIGHT

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Lovers of C. S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia can breathe a collective sigh of relief—perhaps, even, a sigh of wonder and enchantment: your beloved book has successfully made it to the screen. Andrew Adamson’s execution of this prodigious task is sure to delight Narnia fans across the board. The story itself remains wholly intact, and Narnia does, indeed, come alive in a way that has thus far been entrusted only to our literary imaginations.

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Go to Greg's BlogReview by
GREG WRIGHT

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Can we reasonably expect every movie to be a masterpiece? No. Can we reasonably harbor such hope every time walk into a theater? Yes.

The public will likely react to Andrew Adamson’s The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in much the same way they reacted to C. S. Lewis’ short novel. Some will be deeply moved, some will enjoy it but remain fairly indifferent, and some will hate it.

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GEORGE ROSOKReview by
GEORGE ROSOK

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The Chronicles of NarniaThis film may be best suited for the same age group of children for which the books were intended. The violence is not too graphic and the peril may be enough to hold their interest. Also, as in the book, the fight for and triumph of good over evil is easily grasped. I would be surprised if this becomes the timeless classic that the book has become, but I can’t view it through the eyes and mind of a nine-year-old. Time will tell if, for his effort, Adamson can stand with Lewis.

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Click to go to Kathy's blogReview by
KATHY BLEDSOE

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See, I told you he was real.” This is the great line that Lucy Pevensie delivers to her two siblings as Father Christmas drives off after leaving them with the gifts that will equip them to fight for Aslan and Narnia. Georgie Henley is a very gifted little actress, but long before she and the others arrived at this scene in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Andrew Adamson had me. I was enthralled, enchanted, and excited to see Lewis’ work faithfully reproduced (well... mostly) on the giant screen. I was truly moved as I saw my own imagination laid bare before me. I was relieved as I realized with the closing credits that C. S. Lewis himself would probably be able to accept this interpretation of his book—not feeling led to condemn it as another imagination-killer.

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Click to go to Michael's blogReview by
MICHAEL SMITH

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“There is Death in the Camera.” So goes the quote by C. S. Lewis regarding putting books to film. In the case of the latest rendition of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe I’d like to add, There is sleep in the camera. This rapturously-awaited release from Walden Media doesn’t quite deliver, though the story is followed fairly faithfully and there are some clever lines. But the film leaves one desiring the book, one of the great fantasy stories of Western civilization. C. S. Lewis was an almost incomparable genius of philosophical storytelling; but this film is plodding. And I felt let down.

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Click to go to Tom's BlogReview by
TOM PRICE

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Amid dark clouds and searchlights, we hear the drone of planes and the wail of air-raid sirens. We find ourselves inside the cockpit of a German bomber and see the shells falling on British neighborhoods during World War II.

The human cost of war is illustrated in the opening sequence of the long-anticipated film adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ beloved, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. As Peter and Edmund Pevensie flee for their backyard bomb shelter with their mother, the younger boy returns, risking his life to save a photograph of his father who is serving in the military.

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Click to go to Yo's BlogReview by
JOHANN "Yo" SNYDER

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Yup, looks like The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe has all the necessary elements to be the next epic, fantasy/adventure...except for the fact that it’s pretty much missing the epic feel one would expect from such a film. It lacks the intensity and emotional weight of a true epic and instead comes off as a sort of “fantasy/adventure lite”. In fact, “lite” is the word that I think best describes this movie.

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Go to Greg's Blog Lions, Witches and Tug-of-war—Oh My!
An Interview with Michael Flaherty

Feature by
GREG WRIGHT

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Lions, Witches and Tug-of-war—Oh My!
An Interview with Michael Flaherty

Michael Flaherty is the president of a movie studio that manages budgets in excess of $100 million. He’s also a Christian. If you think that this might make him the target of a lot of suspicion, you’d be right. Any time big money and religion get mixed, B.S. radars start working overtime. Mine included, alas!

But Flaherty is pretty open about the purpose of Walden Media. He recently told Christianity Today that he and Cary Granat started the company “to find a way to make more great, inspiring films that can lift people up and encourage them.” Because they realized that the “media really does have a role in influencing hearts and minds,” they decided, “rather than just to curse the darkness, to light a few candles and get more great films out there.”

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Go to Greg's BlogFeature by
GREG WRIGHT

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Norman Stone: Beyond Shadowlands

Stone believes that “honesty and truth are at the top of God’s shopping list.” In bringing a bigger picture of Lewis to the public than that presented in Shadowlands, Stone felt that “the truth was paramount”—Early press about this BBC production promised that it would blow the lid off of long-surpressed facts about the meltdown of the friendship between Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien.

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Reviews by
DAVID BRUCE (video)
GREG WRIGHT
TOM PRICE
KATHY BEDSOE
MICHAEL SMITH
YO
GEORGE ROSOK
JENN WRIGHT

KEVIN MILLER

PETER "PapaBear" CRUIKSHANK





Continue:
Private Spiritual Concerns

I will not post these comments. I welcome your spiritual concerns and prayer needs.  I will correspond with you, usually within two weeks.
Email David Bruce

OFFICIAL SITE
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No other uses are permitted without the prior written consent of owner. Use of the material in violation of the foregoing may result in civil and/or criminal penalties. Credits and dates are subject to change. For more information, please visit their official site.

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