Reviews and Blogs

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Review by MAURICE BROADDUS
Article by MAURICE BROADDUS
Review by MIKE FURCHES

Click to go to Maurice's BlogReview by
MAURICE BROADDUS

THE GOSPEL

Continued on the blog

14.jpg (152 K) One of the things that the reviewers at Hollywood Jesus attempt to do is wrestle with movies, one of the voices of our pop culture—meet them where they are, and make connections from where they are to the Gospel message of Jesus Christ. In other words, we like to appreciate art for art’s sake. So when a movie like The Gospel comes along, it either makes our job that much easier or that much more difficult. One of my major fears when it comes to “Christian” movies is that the audience is going to get less “story” and more “propaganda.” Actually, The Gospel is the latest entry in the “sub-genre” of small-budget black movies, more in the vein of Diary of a Mad Black Woman and Woman Thou Art Loosed. But when you go, expect to “have church.”

20.jpg (115 K)The Gospel, in a nutshell, is the story of “The Prodigal Son” set to Gospel music, lots of Gospel music. The movie recaps the story in its closing moments. There was a man with two sons, both of whom he wanted to follow in his footsteps. The prodigal decided to live life on his own terms, while the other remained with his father. Soon, however, the road got rough and the prodigal ended up doing all sorts of things to survive, eventually hitting rock bottom. He realized that he had placed himself in that situation, prayed about it, and returned home. His father prepared a huge celebration for him in order to say “welcome home.” In other words, it is a story of ruin and reconciliation, a story of a spiritual journey.

Continued on the blog

 

Click to go to Maurice's BlogArticle by
MAURICE BROADDUS

The Gospel and The Black Church

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18.jpg (57 K)Very few movies deal in a real and knowledgeable way with the black church. The Gospel, however, is set against the backdrop of the historic black church and its role within the black community. The movie does well exploring aspects of the historic black church. For example, the black church has always had a missional component to it, serving a socio-political role as well as a spiritual one (and even an economic one). With issues of poverty and economic and social justice at its forefront, the black church—again, historically—has been socially conscious and remained relevant.

08.jpg (103 K)Another tradition of the black church is its incorporation of song, dance, and call-and-response into a worship service. Worship has always been experiential within the tradition of the black church. Some people tend to look at black churches and think that the attenders are in it for the emotional ride. There is an affect, but it is a cognitive affectiveness, where truth is felt and worship is (intuitively) experiential. The emotional ride of worship is done within the narrative of the Gospel. Narrative theology, the emphasis on story-telling, thus has always been a critical part of the preaching tradition.

Which is not to say that the church is without problems.

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Click to go to Mike's BlogTHE GOSPEL
Review by
MIKE FURCHES

Continued on the blog

THE GOSPEL Over the last few years, we have seen an increase in African American films with a focus on Christianity. There was the much heralded, fun filled flick, The Fighting Temptations, and last year’s enjoyable Tyler Perry movie, Diary of a Mad Black Woman. While I personally enjoyed The Fighting Temptations, I also felt that while worthy of discussion Diary of a Mad Black Woman had some things to be desired. I must also comment on last years surprisingly well acted and written T.D. Jakes movie with a backdrop of abuse titled Woman Tou Art Loosed.

This fall we have the release of another film that can be added to this genera, The Gospel, staring Boris Kodjoe, Idris Elba, Nona Gaye, Clifton Powell, Donnie McClurkin, and featuring the likes of Fred Hammon, Hezekiah Walker and Yolanda Adams, also features a sound track thrown together by non other than Kirk Franklin. What we have as a result of this effort written and directed by Rob Hardy is a contemporary story straight out of the Bible itself. Done in a manner that will catch the attention of those coming from a Christian persuasion or non religious tradition, The Gospel is about story, a story that tells of a long lost son coming home to a father who loves him and wants the best for him.

Continued on the blog

Review by MAURICE BROADDUS
Article by MAURICE BROADDUS
Review by MIKE FURCHES





Continue:
—1. Overview (multimedia)
—2. Overview Basic (dial up speed)
—3. Reviews and Blogs
—4. Cast and Crew
—5. Photo Pages
—6. Trailers, Clips, DVDs, Books, Soundtrack
—7. Posters
—8. Production Notes (pdf)
—9. Spiritual Connections
—10. Presentation Downloads
Private Spiritual Concerns

I will not post these comments. I welcome your spiritual concerns and prayer needs.  I will correspond with you, usually within two weeks.
Email David Bruce

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